Tag Archives: Jude Law

Jennie’s Review: The Grand Budapest Hotel

Letter Grade:
(?)

B+
The Good:

All of the Artistic Aspects
Great Cast


The Bad:

The R Rating Limits It

Cast & Crew:

Directed By: Wes Anderson
Starring: Ralph Fiennes, Tony Revolori, F. Murray Abraham, Mathieu Amalric, Adrien Brody, Willem Dafoe, Jeff Goldblum, Jude Law, Harvey Keitel, Bill Murray, Edward Norton, Saoirse Ronan, Léa Seydoux, Jason Schwartzman, Tilda Swinton, Tom Wilkinson, Owen Wilson, and more

Rated R for language, some sexual content and violence

The story opens with an author (Tom Wilkinson) revisiting how his younger self (Jude Law) came about the story of The Grand Budapest Hotel and its current owner (F. Murray Abraham)/ former lobby boy (Tony Revolori) Zero Moustafa.  It is sort of a story within a story within a story.  Luckily the main focus of the film resides with the early 1930’s storyline.  The main story is set in a fictionalized European styled location called Republic of Zubrowka.  In an also fictionalized history that somewhat mimics the years leading up to World War II.  So much so, that there is an occupation of the hotel towards the end of the movie by the ZZ (seemingly replacing the Nazi SS).  This movie, like all Wes Anderson movies, is quirky and strange throughout.  This one however is not so far over the edge that is distractingly so.  With many of his films, about 1/3 of the way through you’re thinking “No one is actually like this” and start just focusing on the absurdities. Not that this one isn’t absurd in many ways, but something about it already being set in a fictional place in an alternate history makes this OK. (more…)








Movie Review: Side Effects

Letter Grade:
(?)

A-
The Good:

All of the acting from the main characters is great
In the end, it is a complete and clever story
The tone of the film is cohesive throughout


The Bad:

The movie seems a longer than its 106 minutes.
The artistic camera shots don’t always make sense with the context

Cast & Crew:

Director: Steven Soderbergh
Writer: Scott Z. Burns
Stars: Rooney Mara, Jude Law, Channing Tatum, & Catherine Zeta-Jones

Rated R for sexuality, nudity, violence and language

If you have seen the trailer already (or click on the video below), you already know that in Side Effects someone is killed, which is good since the opening scene of the movie is the blood all over the floor and the bloodstained footprints leading away from the pools of it.

Cut to 3 months earlier and you see Emily Taylor (Rooney Mara) applying lipstick in the mirror.  She is preparing to visit her husband Martin (Channing Tatum) in, what appears to be a minimum security prison.  You quickly find out that his incarceration is due to some insider trading and that after 4 years, he is about to be released.    Emily seems anxious but happy about his return home.  A seemingly natural response after being a young married couple separated for longer than you have been together.  Not long after Martin’s return though, she has a suicidal episode and is hospitalized.  We find out that this was not the first incident with depression and the psychiatrist on duty at the hospital that evening, Jonathan Banks (Jude Law), is concerned so he insists on a follow-up at his practice. The next few months pass with a lot of prescriptions, deceptions, triumphs, and failures leading up to the aforementioned murder.  The rest of the film focuses on the aftermath of this murder.  Who is to blame and what the truth really is. (more…)








Movie Review: Closer

Letter Grade:
(?)

A-
The Good:

Serves up people doing stupid things in a realistic, believable way.
Excellent performances from the actors, gave me my first real appreciation for how well Clive Owen can act.
Movie really gels and works as a whole.


The Bad:

You're going to want to reach into the screen and shake the characters.

Cast & Crew:

Director: Mike Nichols
Writers: Patrick Marber
Stars: Natalie Portman, Jude Law, Clive Owen

[Originally published 12/10/2004.]

Mike Nichols’ Closer is a heartbreaking film. It’s a film filled with people doing stupid, hurtful things, but that’s ok. Like House of Sand and Fog (and unlike John Q), the stupid decisions are completely believable. When people do stupid, irrational things simply because the writer thinks the plot needs more conflict it doesn’t work. (more…)